Shalom! The Potential of a More Effective, More Faithful Approach to Conflict and Violence

by Glen Gersmehl – Lutheran Peace Fellowship

Introduction:

Our most popular essay (links to it are below) explores a more faithful and effective approach to conflict and violence. Readers have called it “eye-opening” for several reasons.  First, it begins by examining conflict and violence on a much broader and deeper level than usual. This lays the groundwork to plumb the deeper insights and skills of a gospel perspective on our response to violence and injustice (Part Two).  Finally, it explores major real-world examples of nonviolence successes that illustrate practical elements of that response (Part Three). It has received a very positive response from participants in more than 100 forums and workshops.  An appendix offers an annotated listing of over 200 resources and links.

Download the essay:

Shalom! The Potential of a More Effective, More Faithful Approach (8-pg PDF)

Shalom! The Potential of a More Effective, More Faithful Approach (6-pg PDF)

On the author / resource compiler: Glen Gersmehl’s experience includes 8 years as an organizer and educator in the highest crime areas of NY City and a key role in the passage of a major arms control treaty in the Senate. He coordinated a university peace studies program, and has led over 900 workshops on issues of peace, justice, & nonviolence. He has developed numerous creative social change resources, including computer activities used by over a million people. His peace education and activism led to an invitation to serve as U.S. delegate to meetings held in India to plan the UN Decade for Peace, the largest UN effort of its kind. Glen coordinates Lutheran Peace Fellowship and the Peace & Justice Resource Center. He has directed the nation’s largest community leadership training center, presented testimony or worked as a consultant for 20 government agencies and legislative committees, and taken on leadership roles in projects ranging from the arms trade (Federation of American Scientists) and non-proliferation (United Nations), to social service policy (a White House conference).